Google Analytics

The Website Marketing Group's Google Analytics professionals will implement code, track, analyse all web data and create reports leading to a informed decision

Google Analytics

Google Analytics

The New Google Analytics

Google Analytics has been re-designed to help you learn even more about where your visitors come from and how they interact with your site.

Discover. Share. Act.

The new Google Analytics makes it easy to improve your results online.Write better ads, strengthen your marketing initiatives, and create higher-converting websites. Google Analytics is free to all advertisers, publishers, and site owners.

Test your website and increase conversions

You can now use your Google Analytics login to access Website Optimizer.Find out which page designs, headlines, and graphics convert the most visitors.
Get Started

Enquire now


Web analytics is the study of online behaviour in order to improve it. There are two categories; off-site and on-site web analytics. Off-site web analytics refers to web measurement and analysis irrespective of whether you own or maintain a website. It includes the measurement of a website's potential audience (opportunity), share of voice (visibility), and the buzz (comments) that is happening on the Internet as a whole. On-site web analytics measure a visitor's journey once on your website. This includes its drivers and conversions; for example, which landing pages encourage people to make a purchase. On-site web analytics measures the performance of your website in a commercial context. This data is typically compared against key performance indicators for performance, and used to improve a web site or marketing campaign's audience response. Historically, web analytics has referred to on-site visitor measurement. However in recent years this has blurred, mainly because vendors are producing tools that span both categories.

On-site web analytics technologies

Many different vendors provide on-site web analytics software and services. There are two main technological approaches to collecting the data. The first method, logfile analysis, reads the logfiles in which the web server records all its transactions. The second method, page tagging, uses Javascript on each page to notify a third-party server when a page is rendered by a web browser. Both collect data that can be processed to produce web traffic reports.

In addition, other data sources may also be added to augment the data. For example; e-mail response rates, direct mail campaign data,sales and lead information, user performance data such as click heat mapping, or other custom metrics as needed.

Web server logfile analysis

Web servers have always recorded all their transactions in a logfile. It was soon realised that these logfiles could be read by a program to provide data on the popularity of the website. Thus arose web log analysis software.

In the early 1990s, web site statistics consisted primarily of counting the number of client requests (or hits)made to the web server. This was a reasonable method initially, since each web site often consisted of a single HTML file. However, with the introduction of images in HTML, and web sites that spanned multiple HTML files, this count became less useful. The first true commercial Log Analyzer was released by IPRO in 1994.

Two units of measure were introduced in the mid 1990s to gauge more accurately the amount of human activity on web servers. These were page views and visits (or sessions). A page view was defined as a request made to the web server for a page, as opposed to a graphic, while a visit was defined as a sequence of requests from a uniquely identified client that expired after a certain amount of inactivity, usually 30 minutes.The page views and visits are still commonly displayed metrics, but are now considered rather unsophisticated measurements.

The emergence of search engine spiders and robots in the late 1990s, along with web proxies and dynamically assigned IP addresses for large companies and ISPs, made it more difficult to identify unique human visitors to a website. Log analyzers responded by tracking visits by cookies, and by ignoring requests from known spiders.

The extensive use of web caches also presented a problem for logfile analysis. If a person revisits a page, the second request will often be retrieved from the browser's cache, and so no request will be received by the web server. This means that the person's path through the site is lost. Caching can be defeated by configuring the web server, but this can result in degraded performance for the visitor to the website.

Page tagging

Concerns about the accuracy of logfile analysis in the presence of caching, and the desire to be able to perform web analytics as an outsourced service, led to the second data collection method, page tagging or 'Web bugs'.

In the mid 1990s, Web counters were commonly seen — these were images included in a web page that showed the number of times the image had been requested, which was an estimate of the number of visits to that page. In the late 1990s this concept evolved to include a small invisible image instead of a visible one, and, by using JavaScript, to pass along with the image request certain information about the page and the visitor. This information can then be processed remotely by a web analytics company, and extensive statistics generated.

The web analytics service also manages the process of assigning a cookie to the user, which can uniquely identify them during their visit and in subsequent visits.

With the increasing popularity of Ajax-based solutions, an alternative to the use of an invisible image, is to implement a call back to the server from the rendered page. In this case, when the page is rendered on the web browser, a piece of Ajaxcode would call back to the server and pass information about the client that can then be aggregated by a web analytics company. This is in some ways flawed by browser restrictions on the servers which can be contacted with XmlHttpRequest objects.

Logfile analysis vs page tagging

Both logfile analysis programs and page tagging solutions are readily available to companies that wish to perform web analytics. In some cases, the same web analytics company will offer both approaches.The question then arises of which method a company should choose. Thereare advantages and disadvantages to each approach.

Advantages of logfile analysis

The main advantages of logfile analysis over page tagging are as follows:

  • The web server normally already produces logfiles, so the raw data is already available. To collect data via page tagging requires changes to the website.
  • The web server reliably records every transaction it makes. Page tagging relies on the visitors' browsers co-operating, which a certain proportion may not do (for example, if JavaScript is disabled).
  • The data is on the company's own servers, and is in a standard, rather than a proprietary, format. This makes it easy for a company to switch programs later, use several different programs, and analyze historical data with a new program. Page tagging solutions involve vendor lock-in.
  • Logfiles contain information on visits from search engine spiders. Although these should not be reported as part of the human activity, it is useful information for search engine optimization.

Advantages of page tagging

The main advantages of page tagging over logfile analysis are as follows.

  • The JavaScript is automatically run every time the page is loaded. Thus there are fewer worries about caching.
  • It is easier to add additional information to the JavaScript, which can then be collected by the remote server. For example, information about the visitors' screen sizes, or the price of the goods they purchased, can be added in this way. With logfile analysis, information not normally collected by the web server can only be recorded by modifying the URL.
  • Page tagging can report on events which do not involve a request to the web server, such as interactions within Flash movies, partial form completion, mouse events such as onClick, onMouseOver, onFocus, onBlur etc.
  • The page tagging service manages the process of assigning cookies to visitors; with logfile analysis, the server has to be configured to do this.
  • Page tagging is available to companies who do not have access to their own web servers.

Enquire now

Contact Us
View Our Portfolio
Download Brochure
X
DOWNLOAD

View Our Video Testimonials

TWMG Showreel.
Luke Porter - Chamberlain Oceania
Lou Farrugia - Kellyville Kitchens
Ian Maidens - CRC Industries
Robert Alha - Gold's Gym Parramatta
Chris Timmins - Perram and Timmins Funerals

TWMG Showreel

TWMG Showreel
Get In Touch Testimonial from Stacey Smith, National Marketing Manager, B&D Doors and Openers

Your Business

 

About Your Requirements

Services of Interest

Please enter Name, Email, Phone, Message

Search
   
 

Complete the details below and we'll happily call to discuss your project needs.

Please enter Name, Email, Phone, Message
 
What are you looking for ?

Our instant quote will then be sent to your email address.

If you are a large brand with a budget over $10,000
please submit your brief here.




The quote will be sent to your email address instantly


Instant Online Quote Tool

1. Do you need a domain ?


2. Do you need a logo design ?


3. How many website pages do you want ?

4. What type of website do you want ?

5. Do you need hosting with unlimited emails and bandwidth ?


6. Do you want to communicate with your customers on social networking services ?

7. Do you want to email your customers with newsletters ?


8. Do you want your website to be on the 1st page of Google ?